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Wasp #1 (of 4)

71
Comicscore Index
Generally favorable ratings

Based on 10 critic ratings.

Fashion designer, businesswoman, founding AvengerJanet Van Dyne has worn many hats over the course of her super heroic career.

But when an old enemy threatens Janet and her fellow Wasp, Nadia, seemingly against his will, the Van Dynes will have to confront the ghosts in their shared history to get to the bottom of the mystery.

Publication Date
Publisher
Format
Kindle Edition
Print Lenght
23 pages
Language
English
Price
$3.99
Amazon ASIN
B0BJ36RK45

Author
Artist
Cover Artist

50%
50%
10 Critic Ratings & Reviews from:
  • 96

    You Don't Read Comics

    The first quarter of the series is over, and it already feels like it’s rushing by way too quickly. Though Ewing is clearly moving things around in a very tight four-issue space with a firm eye on the overall composition of the series, it’s to the credit of everyone involved that it feels disappointing that the series isn’t going to survive into the coming summer. Janet’s great fun. Always has been. It’s nice to see her in her own series again. Four issues, though? That’s simply not enough time with Janet.
  • 90

    The Super Powered Fancast

    The Story: Ewing delivers an entertaining first issue with a story that has an engaging mystery at the center of it. I love how the story focuses on Janet and is connected to her past. It gives the reader the ability to focus on the character and her journey. I look forward to seeing this story unfold and am excited to see what happens next. The Art: Nie delivers some beautiful art in the issue. The character designs are great and the visual style and tone of the art is perfect for the character.
  • 90

    First Comics News

    Al Ewing, along with artist Kasia Nie introduce a new Wasp series that sees Janet Van Dyne visit her stepdaughter, Nadia Van Dyne, the current Wasp while the two come in contact with Whirlwind, a classic Avengers villain who has quite the history with Jan. I enjoy that Ewing has the utmost respect for these both Jan and Nadia as he fleshes them out to be such standout characters that you can not resist their personalities and the bond the two share as stepmother/stepdaughter. Ewing and Nie outdo themselves by paying homage to The Wasp’s legacy while crafting a story that will bring in readers old and new. It’s stylish and enlightening but reminds everyone that The Wasp is one of Marvel’s most enduring characters.
  • 87

    Comic Watch

    Ewing does what Ewing does best: give us some deep cuts to Marvel continuity, while giving us the next step for these heroes. His Jan is spot on, flirty and aloof, yet pensive and layered, and his Nadia’s sweet, and aloof, so I’m intrigued in what they have in store for us.
  • 83

    Major Spoilers

    This issue even draws a line between the origins of both heroes, adding in something familiar to fans of Ewing’s last founding Avengers book, Immortal Hulk. Wasp #1 is a lovely first issue, taking the time to explain the origins of both heroes to wear the name, wrapping it all in well-plotted and dialogued story beats, and rounding things off with strong art, earning 4 out of 5 stars overall. If you only know the Wasp from the post-Bendis era of Avengers, you’re in for both a treat and a little education, and you should absolutely pick this comic up.
  • 80

    ComicBook.com

    Wasp #1 does a wonderful job of considering everything its title contains. It simultaneously looks back to Wasp's origin printed 60 years ago and ahead to a sprawling new status quo complete with an inheritor of the Wasp legacy. While that wide scope can require a lot of reading, it's matched by a winning distillation of styles modern and classic that capture the Wasp's many visual charms. That appreciation of all things Wasp is rooted into every thread of the issue, even its choice of a distracting villain, making this a thrilling celebration and introduction to the character, regardless of what readers may already know of Janet van Dyne.
  • 80

    Henchman-4-Hire

    This issue is exactly what the comic promises to be. It’s a fun story that celebrates the Wasp and her long, heroic history.
  • 80

    Comic Book Revolution

    Al Ewing and Kasia Nie hit the ground running with a great first issue for the Wasp mini-series. This entire issue just further makes you wonder why Marvel continued to miss the boat on giving Janet Van Dyne a solo series for such a long time. Not only do Ewing and Nie showcase Janet as a great character but immediately get over the chemistry that Janet and Nadia share as fellow Wasps. The main villain plot being centered around both Janet and Nadia’s respective origins has a lot of potential to make this one a standout mini-series.
  • 75

    Multiversity Comics

    For such a mainstay of Marvel Comics, Janet Van Dyne isn’t a character that’s gotten to stand on her own two feet all that often.“The Wasp” #1 is a big step in remedying that, though it’s also easy to see why Wasp solo series haven’t exactly been dominant forces. Al Ewing’s biggest strength is his reverence for the history of the characters he’s writing and unique his ability to creatively weave it into stories while keeping things entirely fresh. When you bring those sensibilities to something like “The Wasp,” that means the mission statement is to imbue the character’s history with more meaning than it currently has. What we’ve seen so far shows that Ewing may well accomplish that. At the same time, it’s a bit underwhelming to be reintroduced to her background and be confronted with a father, an ex-husband, and a C-tier villain. While Wasp stories aren’t exactly the deepest well to pull from, Janet herself is still a character with a lot of history and the strength of “The Wasp” #1 is its very full characterization. Janet’s conversations with Jarvis and Nadia are great moments that demonstrate what kind of a person she is- fun, kind, and supportive. The fight with Whirlwind is an excellent showcase for her competence as a hero as she leads Nadia in on-the-fly strategizing and using mental tactics to win. It’s basic stuff but it works well. The ending is easily the most intriguing part of the issue, showing Nadia’s grandfather as the host for some kind of evil entity. It’s exactly the type of deep cut that Ewing excels at spinning into something compelling and now that we’ve got a solid foundation, hopefully some classic insane storytelling will follow. The artwork is decent, but definitely leaves something to be desired. Everything here is competently done; no moments are bad, there just aren’t any clear highlights either. The fight with Whirlwind is laid out well with a strong sense of geography but it lacks energy and dynamism. The style of illustration is fun and cartoon-like with strong coloring but there’s a sense of expressiveness that’s missing from the whole affair. Jarvis mixing a drink is probably the best moment visually because of its simplicity. This is a style that lends itself well to the more low key moments but falters when the energy picks up.
  • 70

    AIPT

    Wasp #1 sets up an interesting plot that ties to Janet Van Dyne's origins as the Wasp that's worth checking out. Unfortunately, this first issue also spends a lot of time telling us about past events rather than showing them, making for a slower-paced story without much urgency. That said, as an anniversary series, it feels like a good tribute.

More From Wasp (2023)

About the Author: Al Ewing

Al Ewing (/ˈjuːɪŋ/) is a British comics writer who has mainly worked in the small press and for 2000 AD and Marvel Comics.

Career

Al Ewing began his career writing stories in the four-page Future Shocks format for 2000 AD and moved on to regular stints on Judge Dredd (2008–2015), for which his 2010 story “Doctor What?” marked Brendan McCarthy’s return to 2000 AD. They later worked together on a new series entitled The Zaucer of Zilk. Ewing worked on Damnation Station and Zombo, the latter illustrated by Henry Flint, which was collected in trade paperback in 2010.

Ewing has also contributed to Solar Wind, FutureQuake, and The End Is Nigh. He is responsible for the mobile comic Murderdrome, created with P. J. Holden.

In May 2007, Ewing created the comedy blog “The Diary of Ralph Dibney”, writing as the titular DC Comics superhero (also known as Elongated Man), Dibney’s therapist, or as the even more obscure DC Hero Richard Dragon, as they react to the events of each week’s issue of the comic book 52.

Breaking into American comic books, Ewing was also picked by Garth Ennis to provide a six-issue arc on Jennifer Blood, published by Dynamite Entertainment, and a spin-off series The Ninjettes.

His debut prose novel Pax Britannia: El Sombra, published by Abaddon Books in 2007, features a mysterious Mexican hero fighting back against the menace of steam-powered Nazis. It is set in the same Steampunk alternate history as the other novels from the Pax Britannia series. Three other novels have been published since, with a fifth on the way.

Ewing wrote Mighty Avengers and Loki: Agent of Asgard for Marvel Comics and co-wrote the first year of the Eleventh Doctor Doctor Who title with Rob Williams for Titan Comics.

Ewing has since written New Avengers, U.S.Avengers, Ultimates, Rocket, Royals, and The Immortal Hulk, all for Marvel. The Immortal Hulk was a nominee for the 2019 Eisner Award in the “Best Continuing Series” category, and had earned publisher Marvel Comics a Diamond Gem Award the previous year as “Best New Comic Book Series.”

In 2021, Ewing won the GLAAD Media Award for Outstanding Comic Book at the 32nd GLAAD Media Awards for his work on Empyre and received an additional nomination in 2021 and one in 2022 for Guardians of the Galaxy. In June 2021, it was announced that Ewing would serve as co-writer of Venom alongside Ram V, with Bryan Hitch serving as artist.

Personal life

At the end of Pride Month 2021, Ewing came out as bisexual.

[Latest Update: July 23, 2022]

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