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The Department of Truth #12

75
Comicscore Index
Generally favorable ratings

Based on 8 critic ratings.

Publication Date
Publisher
Format
Kindle Edition
Print Lenght
27 pages
Language
English
Price
$1.99
Amazon ASIN
B096GB15GK

13%
25%
63%
8 Critic Ratings & Reviews from:
  • 100

    DC Comics News

    The Department of Truth #12 is another great chapter of a series that is quite unlike anything else I’ve ever read. This is the kind of story that messes with your head, but in a way that leaves you eager for the next issue to do mess with your head even more.

  • 100

    Big Comic Page

    I’ve read some truly brilliant comics this year, but Department of Truth is sitting right at the very top of that list. And with four months left of the year, its going to take something very, very special to knock it off first place.

  • 100

    Big Comic Page

    I’ve read some truly brilliant comics this year, but Department of Truth is sitting right at the very top of that list. And with four months left of the year, its going to take something very, very special to knock it off first place.

  • 92

    The Super Powered Fancast

    The Story: James Tynion IV is absolutely masterful at drawing in the reader and surprising him/her at every turn. This story is brilliantly done and filled with tension throughout. The plot moves beautifully and the twists and turns throughout kept me guessing right up to the very end. This is a great look at who we are as a society and the power of belief. This story is important and just incredibly fun and entertaining to read. I love the cliffhanger that the story ends on and cannot wait for what’s next.

    The Art: Simmonds is amazing as an artist and this story showcases that in spades. Not only did I enjoy the throwback style in the beginning of the issue, but the seamless transition to the stark reality of the present was brilliantly done.

  • 90

    Forces Of Geek

    The story by James Tynion IV is something else. I feel like this book answers a lot of questions and sets up a ton more. Just the way I like things. The art is okay but it takes me out of the experience as it always seems to do.

  • 80

    You Don't Read Comics

    So Cole and Hawk are going to Milwaukee in Black Helicopters that only sort of exist. This can safely be mentioned at the end of the review as the revelations in the issue dont really have anything to do with the direction of the series, which ends up being a bit of a problem for it. The central action of the series isnt centrally squared on the main conflicts. The stories that are being told in the text ARE interesting, but theyre not whats going on in the accompanying art, which makes for a bit of a disconnect between text and graphics.

  • 75

    COMICON

    More exposition on the nature of belief and tulpas, but after twelve issues it’s beginning to feel repetitive. Thankfully Martin Simmonds’ art saves the day once more.

  • 50

    ComicBook.com

    The “Vile” storyline reaches its conclusion in a very fitting Batman-esque manner. At the end of last issue, Batman was seemingly taken over by the Vile parasite that has plagued him for several weeks. As Batman struggles to deal with the parasite’s effects, he still has to contend with both the Penguin and Roland Worth’s continued quest of vengeance. Things end on a mostly clean note, with a rather trite explanation that comes straight out of the “Batman with enough prep time can beat anyone” department. The Task Force Z backup story is only slightly better, with a whole lot of meandering towards a goal without revealing what that goal actually is. Honestly, this is probably the weakest Detective Comics in recent months.

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