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The Amazing Spider-Man #28

58
Comicscore Index
Mixed or average ratings

Based on 13 critic ratings.

The new-and-improved Doctor Octopus takes his upgraded tentacles for a rampage through Oscorp! Can the deadliest Doc Ock ever be stopped?

Publication Date
Publisher
Format
Kindle Edition
Language
English
Amazon ASIN
B0C118K6VZ

Author
Cover Artist

8%
15%
46%
31%
13 Critic Ratings & Reviews from:
  • 100

    Un Cómic Más

    Octopus’s plan is just beginning, suspense, mystery and tentacles everywhere.

    Mcguiness offers such classic and characteristic art that gives Spider-man superhuman yet realistic flexibility. The facial expressions are mesmerizing.

  • 100

    First Comics News

    While the first part of the Doctor Octopus arc didn’t make any waves, the current chapter is by far more exciting but also makes good on showing what a huge threat Doc Ock can be when his intelligence and scheming come into play and might I add the Spidey/Ock fight sequences really made this issue a joy to read. Ed McGuinness brings Zeb Wells’ scripts to life in a way that John Romita Jr. could never fathom, especially when it involves Norman Osborn and J. Jonah Jameson (We definitely need more scenes with just the two of them) as their interaction shows how they’ve grown after so many years (Simply classic); Spider-Man fans will find that the stories they grew up with back in the 1970s and early 80s are alive and well within this issue while waiting with pins and needles to find out Doc Ock’s next plan of attack.

  • 92

    The Comicbook Dispatch

    A hard-bitten journalist’s surprising vulnerability and the deadliness of endearing creatures allow readers to ponder the worth of first impressions in Amazing Spider-Man #28.

  • 84

    The Super Powered Fancast

    The Story: Wells continues to bring the story back to classic Spidey action and adventure that is a lot more enjoyable than the existential angst that has been the problem with this series for so long. The story was straight action mixed with humor and suspense and was thoroughly enjoyable. I enjoyed the rising tension throughout the issue with Doc Ock and the confrontation between him, Spidey and Osborn was done exceedingly well to showcase just how smart Octavius is. The issue ends on a great cliffhanger that makes me interested in seeing what happens next.

    The Art: McGuinness delivers some amazing art throughout the issue. The visual style is great and I love the bright, detailed action elements throughout as well as showing Ock as a being of pure rage and menace.

  • 80

    ComicBook.com

    Doctor Octopus’ current aesthetic leans heavily into his Silver Age origins as a pudgy man with rage issues uses mad science to seize control. But there’s never any doubt that he’s a bona fide threat, even if his new Ocktoids blur the line between evil and adorable. As Octopus carves his way through Spider-Man’s world and reveals traps established across the past year of Amazing Spider-Man comics, artist Ed McGuinness proves himself to be a perfect pairing for the material. It’s a delight to watch the Ocktoids work themselves through various configurations, showcasing this upgrade in action. That leaves plenty of space for the enormous personalities involved in this conflict, including Norman Osborn and J. Jonah Jameson, to rehash past grievances and show just how much they’ve also evolved over the past 10 years of comics. With so many classic characters arranged in a genuinely new fashion, Amazing Spider-Man #28 manages to summon the magic of classic 1970s Spider-Man action in a modern style. Wherever Doc Ock’s plan may lead, readers will want to follow.

  • 80

    Comics Nexus by Inside Pulse

    An action-packed issue with emotional moments around the sentient tentacles. Awesome art.

  • 75

    COMICON

    This series has so much going for it. I want it to be this good all the time, and without the specter of some horrific tropes hanging over it.

  • 70

    You Don't Read Comics

    Wells works with all of the standard Spidey tropes in slightly new ways. It’s not terribly insightful or groundbreaking, but it DOES take a certain amount of vision and talent to put together all of those familiar elements that Spidey has been dealing with over the decades in a way that doesn’t feel excessively repetitious. The overall feel of the new Doc Ock is interesting…but lacks anything beyond the physical that would make him seem any more interesting than he has been in the past.

  • 65

    AIPT

    In Amazing Spider-Man #28, Spidey is metaphorically tied up with fixing robots before literally being tied up by Doc Ock. It’s a chapter that looks fantastic thanks to McGuinness’ incredible art, but lacks plot progression or interesting character work.

  • 62

    Comic Watch

    The Amazing Spider-Man #28 is a step towards the light, delivering an unproblematic but wholly vapid story that is sure to be building towards something, but as of right now is simple surface level ‘fun’.

  • 60

    Spider Man Crawlspace

    This was a not-bad part of this Doc Ock story. It was better than the previous issue, and it actually made me want to read the next issue. Isn’t that we all want from a comic book?

  • 55

    Weird Science Marvel Comics

    Spider-Man #28 is a semi-serious, forgettable, and sometimes silly time-waster to take your mind off the horrendous death of Kamala Khan. Doc Ock’s upgrade has interesting threat potential, but JJJ is written bizarrely out of character, and the setup is somewhat ridiculous.

  • 30

    Major Spoilers

    As a fat man, the cover of this issue made me mad, but the interior art of Amazing Spider-Men #28 doubles down on all the things that I found unpleasant, combined with a story that goes through paces that feel like they make little to no sense and ends on an unearned note of melodrama. And perhaps most infuriating, it’s been barely a month since the death of Ms. Marvel, and her supposedly transformative demise isn’t even mentioned in passing. You won’t regret it if you skip this one.

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