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Superman: Lost #4 (of 10)

69
Comicscore Index
Generally favorable ratings

Based on 8 critic ratings.

Can even Superman withstand being pushed past the point of emotional and psychological endurance? Marooned on a comet in uncharted space, the Man of Steel reflects on his humble Smallville origins as crushing emotional fatigue threatens to end his journey back-trauma which results in Lois’s struggle to reconnect with the virtual stranger in her own home.

Publication Date
Publisher
Format
Kindle Edition
Print Length
26 pages
Language
English
Amazon ASIN
B0C5N72QXK

13%
38%
50%
8 Critic Ratings & Reviews from:
  • 100

    Fortress of Solitude

  • 95

    Lyles Movie Files

    Superman Lost isn’t a traditional Superman style story. That’s probably the biggest appeal to it. Writer/co-plotter Priest and artist/co-plotter Carlo Pagulayan are crafting a unique Superman tale without sacrificing anything true to the core of the character. And this is the kind of long-form story that makes sense to tell in a denser format as it reinforces to Superman exactly what his purpose is even far beyond Earth’s solar system.

    (…)

    Superman Lost is feeling like it’s in the midst of a special Superman story and if it continues to explore this missing time frame of Superman’s life, it might go down as one of the classic must-read tales featuring the Man of Steel.

  • 90

    Geek Dad

    This issue comes full circle in a way that almost feels like a finale, which is very interesting—we’re less than halfway there. But heroes, villains, and wild cards all make a return appearance—including the horrible little gremlins who kicked Superman off their spaceship for not having the exact currency they needed. They’ve been pulled into a much larger, more corrupt mission, but it’s not the straight-forward villainous act it seems like. Rather, they’ve been hired for something rather disturbing, in a way that pulls in some real-world implications. What do you do when members of your society seem to want to exist in a different reality from everyone else? How far do you go to keep your society together? It’s a tricky question to answer, and few writers would tackle it in a story about Superman getting lost in space. That’s what makes Priest stand out, and this series continues to build steam as it tells a very different sort of Superman tale.

  • 89

    The Super Powered Fancast

    This issue comes full circle in a way that almost feels like a finale, which is very interesting—we’re less than halfway there. But heroes, villains, and wild cards all make a return appearance—including the horrible little gremlins who kicked Superman off their spaceship for not having the exact currency they needed. They’ve been pulled into a much larger, more corrupt mission, but it’s not the straight-forward villainous act it seems like. Rather, they’ve been hired for something rather disturbing, in a way that pulls in some real-world implications. What do you do when members of your society seem to want to exist in a different reality from everyone else? How far do you go to keep your society together? It’s a tricky question to answer, and few writers would tackle it in a story about Superman getting lost in space. That’s what makes Priest stand out, and this series continues to build steam as it tells a very different sort of Superman tale.

  • 80

    AIPT

    While the issue hops around, this is where Carlo Pagulayan gets to play in different locations and with reactive body language. The pages and moments where Superman was in his new white space travel suit were the best. In the first portion, Pagulayan shows us Superman going through many emotional reactions: anger, sorrow, hopelessness, and a sad reunion with a touch of joy. The second area then allows Pagulayan to show Superman saving the day with classic feats of heroics and then finishes with a Superman in debate. This interesting discussion puts Superman in a situation where he is unsure of what is right, and it isn’t his conflict, but can Superman ignore this situation?

  • 80

    ComicBook.com

    The overall shape of Superman: Lost begins to cohere as Superman returns to the strange Earth-like planet he recently departed and finds he’s needed there, too; although it makes the prior issue seem like an unnecessary detour, this setting is filled with potential. Superman is presented with a series of ethical conundrums regarding the nature of liberty and salvation, all of them thinly veiled allusions to modern political conflicts. That’s what makes Superman’s struggle to resolve the competing interests and willingness to set his own aside all the more powerful. While the space dolphins may read like an afterthought, Superman’s misguided venture provides him with a vulnerable moment that reminds readers even an invincible being may still sacrifice. It’s a compelling portrait of a stranger in a strange land still seeking truth and justice. Whether he can discover it and what it may cost will likely lie at the heart of Superman: Lost.

  • 70

    The Comicbook Dispatch

    Superman: Lost #4 is the weakest issue of the miniseries so far, feeling more like a step back than a leap forward. But putting Clark in a moral dilemma he’s rarely faced before, in addition to a great surprise character popping up at the end, makes the book better than average.

  • 50

    Weird Science DC Comics

    Superman: Lost #4 is gibberish wrapped in nonsense. Priest is going out of his way to use Superman’s time lost in space to create as many on-the-nose metaphors for real-life social ills as possible. It reads like a city hall meeting agenda rattled off in random order, printed on excellent art. If Priest is using Superman’s predicament to make a soapbox point, he’s missing the mark spectacularly.

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