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Superman '78: The Metal Curtain #2 (of 6)

63
Comicscore Index
Generally favorable ratings

Based on 7 critic ratings.

Superman brings Lois to the Fortress of Solitude for a private interview.

Meanwhile, the Russians launch their first assault with their mighty Metallo in hopes of drawing the Man of Steel out into the open.

Witness as the power of the people breaks Superman!

Publication Date
Publisher
Format
Kindle Edition
Print Lenght
26 pages
Language
English
Amazon ASIN
B0CMK7GN92

14%
43%
43%
7 Critic Ratings & Reviews from:
  • 95

    Lyles Movie Files

    It’s wild that two of DC’s strongest titles right now are throwback mini-series to two of their earlier box office hits. The Metal Curtain has clearly been a tremendous read so far and only looks to get better next issue.

  • 90

    Geek Dad

    The first Superman ’78 miniseries introduced Superman’s most powerful villain yet in Brainiac, and I was a little skeptical after the first issue here if Metallo could live up to that. This issue makes clear that while Brainiac was a bigger-scale issue, Metallo will be a much more personal oneand he’s coming for everything Superman loves in the name of the Soviet Union.

  • 84

    Supergirl Comic Box Commentary

    Overall a very entertaining issue, giving us the emotional stuff with Lois and the action stuff with Metallo. We even get a decent cliffhanger. How cool that Hal is in the house! Now if only we can finally get Kara!

  • 80

    The Comicbook Dispatch

    Superman 78: The Metal Curtain #2 continues a great storyline that feels like another Christopher Reeve film. It pays homage to the second movie and builds off of the previous comic series well, while also introducing new characters. This version of Metallo is a formidable opponent, even if hes not the traditional version of the character. What do you think might happen next?

  • 72

    Comic Watch

    Superman 78: The Metal Curtain #2 is a quick read due to a lot of action in the second half but it works as a great introduction between Superman and Metallo. So far the series has set up a solid conflict that works well in the context of the source material. Venditti and Guidry find a nice balance between paying homage to the cinematic universe and introducing fresh twists to bring it into the current landscape of comics.

  • 70

    Fortress of Solitude

  • 50

    ComicBook.com

    Metallo arrives in The Metal Curtain #2 and doesn’t provide readers many reasons to return as the newest supervillain in Superman ’78 sports a generically blocky design and a motivation with less depth than Ivan Drago’s. Much of the issue sports a familiar tone that is comfortable for existing fans of this particular take on Superman, but offers very little in the way of novel material to be explored. The best of what’s delivered builds upon inventions from the prior series, specifically the shrunken survival of Superman’s birth parents. While the potential for revealing his true identity to Lois creates a humorous scenario, it also seems played out after two movies and a comic book series that all teased the same situation. Combined with multiple, arctic expenses defined almost entirely by wide swaths of snow and a nebulous Fortress of Solitude, there’s not much originality or expansion to be found in The Metal Curtain #2.

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