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Suicide Squad: Dream Team #2 (of 4)

63
Comicscore Index
Generally favorable ratings

Based on 9 critic ratings.

Dreamer has made her break from the rest of the Squad, and Amanda Waller is pissed.

Who will side with the dream-walking precog, and who will kiss the ring of the DC Universe’s premier control freak?

The answers will surprise you (except I think we all pretty much know Bizarro will do something “opposite,” though, right?) as the Dream Team shatters!

Publication Date
Publisher
Format
Kindle Edition
Print Lenght
21 pages
Language
English
Amazon ASIN
B0CW1KVGFD

22%
22%
56%
9 Critic Ratings & Reviews from:
  • 100

    AIPT

    Do yourself a favor and pick up this issue (and last issue if you missed it). This story and team are a blast and there’s a lot more action to come. This is the best the Suicide Squad has been in ages. A great and fun read that will have you waiting impatiently for the next issue.

  • 95

    Batman-News

    Nicole Maines and the creative team involved with putting Suicide Squad: Dream Team together should be proud of themselves because they are crafting a really solid story so far. Two issues in, and I’m all in and can’t wait for the next issue. Amanda Waller has set her plans in motion, and what will Dreamer do now? And how will the other members of the squad get involved? Until next time. Go read this comic as soon as possible!

  • 90

    COMICON

    Where the Squad goes, chaos follows, especially when the plans of their taskmaster Waller become quite clear in Suicide Squad: Dream Team #2. An issue that perfectly captures the feeling and mood necessary for these characters and their place in the DC Universe. Each page makes it clear that this creative team knows what they are doing, and how to make it flow perfectly.

  • 85

    Geek Dad

    Waller is a fascinating character when written well, but I don’t think this current heel turn has really worked well for her – and much of this issue sounds like meta-commentary on that. There’s a flashback to Waller’s start of darkness years before she ever created Task Force X that’s really interesting—her family has been explored before, but never in any sort of definitive manner. But it’s not a surprise that Dreamer is the character Maines writes the best here, and I’m very excited for her upcoming graphic novel in April. This series, while strong, feels like a Dreamer series with everyone else in the back seat.

  • 85

    The Aspiring Kryptonian

    This issue’s layouts felt less jumbled than in issue #1 making the flow of the story more coherent. The art is top notch and the book is worth picking up on that alone. Add in the fact Nicole Maines is proving to be quite the storyteller and this book becomes a must have.

  • 65

    Fortress of Solitude

  • 65

    Caped Joel

  • 60

    Dark Knight News

    Suicide Squad: Dream Team #2 continues setting the scene for Maine’s run, which so far is going well. I’m looking forward to seeing what she can bring to the story and seeing how, or if, the team will survive their missions.

  • 50

    ComicBook.com

    The initial mission of Suicide Squad: Dream Team is resolved in short order as it establishes the foundation for this miniseries’ story. Although there’s plenty of confusion in tying up the loose ends from Dream Team #1, once Waller arrives on the scene the new status quo is presented clearly enough. The narrative is split between Waller’s ambitions alongside the team she uses to obtain them and a more heroic journey presented by Dreamer following her exit from Gamorra. While the ugliness displayed in a US-led coup over a sovereign state provides few redeeming elements on the page, the staging presented between Waller and Dreamer near the issue’s end is far more intriguing. Not only does it present Dreamer as a desperate hero grappling with her complex situation, but it provides a sympathetic lens for Waller – a useful contrast to the pure villainy the character has been disposed to recently. None of that is to say Waller’s actions are justifiable (they are not), but her perspective is made to be understandable and that adds a useful layer to the building conflict between herself and Dreamer. It seems the heart of this story still lies ahead of it.

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