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Spider-Woman #2

59
Comicscore Index
Mixed or average ratings

Based on 2 critic ratings.

Spider-Woman and Silk get split up leaving Silk alone on her suicide mission.

Spider-Woman doesn’t look like she’s in better shape, undercover in the most dangerous place in the multiverse!

Publication Date
Publisher
Format
Kindle Edition
Print Length
23 pages
Language
English
Price
$1.99
Amazon ASIN
B00ZO1LLK8

Cover Artists
Variant Cover Artist

100%
2 Critic Ratings & Reviews from:
  • 80

    The Fandom Post

    I’m still in the somewhat wary camp of this series simply because I’m not invested in the Spider-Verse, but I keep getting drawn into it in bits and pieces. The opening issue helped a lot in being accessible and letting new readers understand the overall arc and what was going on. This one plays into that but it also definitely gives us time understanding who Jessica is and how she thinks and operates. It’s been more instructive than one might have guessed considering what it’s a part of. I also liked that this one focused largely on Jessica and not having to deal with all the introductory stuff, so it could just hit the ground running on Loom World. It also managed, surprisingly, to get me to like Silk a bit based on the pages she has here, though there’s still a random factor to her that keeps me wary of her as well. All told, I definitely enjoyed the book and am looking forward to more, but part of me still wishes it had the opportunity to be its own book first before going into all of this.

  • 68

    IGN

    With their setup out of the way, Dennis Hopeless and Greg Land smartly devote more page time to their titular lead, dropping Spider-Woman smack dab into Inheritor territory. Doing reconnaissance whilst wearing red footie pajamas seems less than inconspicuous, but as luck would have it there’s another spandex wearing doppelganger around for her to mimic. Various shenanigans ensue, and while certain pairings are indeed entertaining, the tone of the book feels almost overly humorous given the book’s wide reaching ramifications. Silk’s cameo also feels a bit extraneous considering they only just parted ways, but the resulting reveal that follows does post an intriguing problem for the Inheritors to solve. While the issue does read better in terms of overall tone, it’s still a bit disheartening that most of Spider-Woman’s ability to glean new information comes from her powers of persuasion or surprise romantic entanglements, no matter how many questions said interactions raise.

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