Skip to content

Spider-Boy #4

75
Comicscore Index
Generally favorable ratings

Based on 4 critic ratings.

We’ve seen Spider-Boy “monster out” before…but who’s to say that’s not his true form? Maybe he’s more spider than boy and it’s “Bailey Briggs” that’s really his disguise? Join special guest star Miles Morales as he tracks down the terror that everyone’s now calling…the Boy-Spider!

Publication Date
Publisher
Format
Kindle Edition
Print Lenght
25 pages
Language
English
Amazon ASIN
B0CNQP4GCD

Author
Cover Artist

25%
75%
4 Critic Ratings & Reviews from:
  • 96

    The Comicbook Dispatch

    Bailey stops trying to gain Spider-Man’s respect and embraces his inner monster, while Madame Monstrosity reveals the identity of his mother in Spider-Boy #4.

  • 90

    ComicBook.com

    Spider-Boy has in short order become one of my favorites each and every month, and Dan Slott has effectively endeared me to the character all the more in Spider-Boy #4. You can’t help but feel for Bailey’s situation, especially when magnified by Spider-Man’s truly inept turn as guardian and mentor. Seriously, how did Peter get so bad at this? Slott’s use of this fractured relationship allows Bailey to explore feelings of hurt and betrayal without it feeling stuck in angsty dated tropes, and it’s balanced out with Bailey’s kindness towards others who are also misunderstood. There are plenty of lighthearted moments to keep things from getting too heavy as well, and surprisingly more of those are found in the villain’s side of the story “Missing Pieces.” The entire book benefits from the talents of artists Paco Medina and Ty Templeton and colors Erick Arciniega and Dee Cunniffe, and the I’m genuinely interested in where this series goes next.

  • 90

    First Comics News

  • 70

    Weird Science Marvel Comics

    Spider-Boy #4 is one of the better issues in the series because it introduces a mysterious villain, delivers a fair amount of age-appropriate drama, and plants intriguing seeds for what comes next. Still, Slott has a bad habit of reframing decent villains as jokes, which kills the hero vibe of the book, so better falls short of great.

More From Spider-Boy (2023)