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Hulk Annual #1

72
Comicscore Index
Generally favorable ratings

Based on 9 critic ratings.

HULK VS. GIGANTO!

A documentary crew is on the hunt for a monster at the heart of a gamma radiation leak, but they get much more than they bargained for when they end up on Hulk’s angry side – and caught in the middle of a brawl between two unstoppable giants, as Hulk battles an unleashed Giganto!

Plus: A special preview, exclusive to this issue, of the shocking new direction Hulk is headed in this summer!

Publication Date
Publisher
Format
Kindle Edition
Print Lenght
34 pages
Language
English
Amazon ASIN
B0BWSMDQX4

Cover Artists
Variant Cover Artists
Letterer

11%
33%
56%
9 Critic Ratings & Reviews from:
  • 100

    AIPT

    Hulk Annual 2023 is such an ambitious idea, taking an incredibly specific genre of horror film and adapting it to a comic seems like an impossible take, and yet it is achieved superbly. There is probably not a character that fits the style more, and he is taken to uncharted and terrifying territory. The Hulk may be the good guy in the end but it doesn’t look like that when he’s next to innocent people causing mayhem. Even attempting the found footage format deserves high praise, but landing it and making it one of the scariest and most interesting comics of the year so far warrants even more.

  • 100

    But Why Tho?

    Hulk Annual 2023 is such an ambitious idea, taking an incredibly specific genre of horror film and adapting it to a comic seems like an impossible take, and yet it is achieved superbly. There is probably not a character that fits the style more, and he is taken to uncharted and terrifying territory. The Hulk may be the good guy in the end but it doesn’t look like that when he’s next to innocent people causing mayhem. Even attempting the found footage format deserves high praise, but landing it and making it one of the scariest and most interesting comics of the year so far warrants even more.

  • 100

    You Don't Read Comics

    Hulk Annual #1 brings the horror wonderfully. Pepose, Majado, Delgado, and Petit drop an excellent found footage horror story that works so well because of Marvel additions like the Hulk and the Mole Man. Anyone who isn’t already excited for Johnson’s upcoming run will definitely be after this issue’s ending teaser. This is a Hulk comic that will appeal to anyone.

  • 90

    First Comics News

    After the hot mess that was Donny Cates and Ryan Ottley’s run (Seriously, Ottley should stick to doing art because his writing is just BLEH!!) this annual is a nice change of pace as a plucky film crew gets together to work on a documentary on none other than…The Hulk! Yes, this concept has been done before in “The Blair Witch Project”, “Cloverfield” and “Chronicle” but this is a Hulk story done from the point of view of a camera lens. The script leaves some room for the action sequences. Yes, someone from the film crew dies (**NO SPOILERS**) but for all its faults such as the pacing and the fact that the concept drags on, it’s still a likable story that bridges the gap from the disastrous Cates/Ottley run while getting ready for Phillip Kennedy Johnson’s run, so be prepared for an annual that feels more like an unnecessary “Cloverfield” sequel rather than a Hulk story. Thank god for PKJ!

  • 84

    Comic Watch

    Writer David Pepose clearly knows his genre stuff, and delightfully, manages to wring a taut thriller onto the page that faithfully adapts tried-and-true tropes (“Hang on, let me turn on the night vision!”) for the comics page in a way that feels legitimately tense. There’s wonderful bits within the dialogue of the “microphone” shorting out with a sczzzzzzz sound effect which lends to the authenticity. Small details like that help sell the story of four intrepid student journalists trying in vain to capture footage not only of the Hulk, but of the town near to his origin, now ruined by being the site of his unholy gamma birth. There’s a lot of poignancy to that, and Pepose, hot off of Savage Avengers and with a hot new Moon Knight miniseries debuting this summer, wrings it with absolute conviction. The Hulk may seem like he’s only a guest star in his own story to the untrained observer, but his spirit looms large in every panel.

    (…)

    Hulk Annual #1 boldly imports the found footage narrative style with expert ease and relatively few hiccups in translation. Don’t skip this comic – it’s a unique storytelling experience worthy of the big screen!

  • 80

    Major Spoilers

    Hulk Annual #1 is a solid comic that introduces a complex theme. I am unsure how this theme will apply in the larger scheme of things, but the next chapter of Hulk will undoubtedly be exciting.

  • 70

    Weird Science Marvel Comics

    Hulk Annual #1 (2023) delivers a Hulk horror story in found-footage style to give readers a fresh take on monster Marvel stories. The found-footage aspects are well done, and the art is decent enough, but for a Hulk annual, there’s precious little Hulk in the entire issue.

  • 70

    Marvel Heroes Library

    My, that cover is scary. What better way to introduce an event they are calling the “Age of Monsters.” So, we are offered a found-footage movie in comic book form, a few years after this movie fad had run out of steam. Okay, though. The second story is more of a teaser than a story and I’m not sure if I followed what was going on so I may be revising this in a few months. At a time when most annuals are parts of crossovers, a stand-alone story is a notable difference.

  • 60

    ComicBook.com

    Hulk Annual #1 provides readers a much-needed change of pace and the best issue of Hulk in about a year’s time in an Annual that reads like a genuine Annual. The story provides readers a different perspective on its eponymous anti-hero in a standalone story following a documentary crew on their quest to find the Hulk. It’s an intriguing angle that provides readers a familiar but well structured spin on the “seekers becoming the hunted” story. The sequences framed from a cameraman’s perspective are well-selected, building tension and making the story feel nearly like an artifact from within Marvel Comics, without overwhelming the issue’s brisk pacing. However, the absence of character beyond quick sketches made at the start leaves little room for surprise or growth. It’s clear who’s doomed at the very start with a metatextual wink at the camera; that wouldn’t be a problem if this story explored this ill-fated character or any of their cohort, but the film being shot doesn’t even seem to possess a purpose or perspective. It’s this lack of detail around the edges that leave Hulk Annual feeling like a capable, but undeveloped take on a premise with real potential. When the Hulk turns to the camera and transforms clear subtext into text, it’s simply a bit too much.

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