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Alan Scott: The Green Lantern #2 (of 6)

74
Comicscore Index
Generally favorable ratings

Based on 11 critic ratings.

Alan’s search for the killer framing him continues!

But why are the murder victims people from Alan’s past, and how does this connect to his brief stint in Arkham Asylum?!

Publication Date
Publisher
Format
Kindle Edition
Print Lenght
26 pages
Language
English
Amazon ASIN
B0CLYSJ7NG

Colorist
Cover Artist

9%
27%
64%
11 Critic Ratings & Reviews from:
  • 100

    AIPT

    A standard at AIPT is that the only thing wrong with a 10/10 issue is that there isn’t more of it. Somehow, Alan Scott: The Green Lantern #2 doesn’t quite fit that notion. After all, it addresses its themes quickly and succinctly and ends at the perfect point. There is no point in running past that. Unfortunately, we don’t necessarily have an 11/10, but a perfect score is close enough, and this book has undeniably earned it.

  • 100

    Comic Watch

    Alan Scott: The Green Lantern #2 excellently follows one of the best comics of the year in a way that keeps the series on pace to end up with an Eisner.

  • 100

    ComicsOnline

    Two chapters in and we have already been given ample reasons to want more time with Alan Scott and this creative team beyond this initial arc.

  • 100

    Derby Comics

    Alan Scott: The Green Lantern #2 is a masterful continuation of Sheridan’s captivating story. The issue delves deeper into Alan’s past, revealing the traumatic experiences that shaped him and continue to influence his actions. Sheridan’s exploration of Alan’s identity is both poignant and thought-provoking, adding depth and layers to the character. It also holds a mirror up to today’s world and shows just how little has changed in many regards when it comes to LGBTQ individuals who face their own inner demons accepting who they are for fear of persecution, hatred, violence, or excommunication from society or those who are meant to be their safe spaces.

  • 95

    Geek Dad

    There’s a fascinating mystery at the center of the story, as well as a powerful and dangerous new antagonist, but this series wouldn’t be half as good as it is without the brilliant character work Sheridan is bringing.

  • 90

    Nerd Initiative

    Through the powerful writing of Sheridan, Alan Scott’s journey into becoming a hero instantly wins over readers with this issue. The creative team of Tormey, Herms and Gattoni bring out the intense will of Scott as he presses forward even when society tries shoving back.

  • 84

    Graphic Policy

    Alan Scott: The Green Lantern #2 is a fantastic issue that delivers a tragic origin while adding a dose of real history into it all. It takes Alan’s continued evolution as a character to the next level creating even more motivation to his actions and setting up what should be an intriguing villain to come.

  • 80

    ComicBook.com

    Only two issues in, this series has established itself as a surprising—albeit, occasionally a bit too ambitious—reinvention of Alan Scott. Without getting into spoilers, Tim Sheridan’s script is both sweeping and incredibly intimate, offering fans a lot to chew on with regards to Alan’s past, present, and future. Cian Tormey’s art gorgeously fits within a sort of house style, although some visuals occasionally require a bit of a double take. By and large, Alan Scott: The Green Lantern is succeeding at everything it’s supposed to be, and that’s great to see.

  • 80

    Major Spoilers

    All in all, Alan Scott: The Green Lantern #2 is a winner, taking one of the earliest superheroes and giving him a modern spin, with the full force of retrograde attitudes to alternative lifestyles proving to be the worst “supervillain” in recent memory. I’m interested in seeing where this all goes, even if the Red Lantern is fait accompli.

  • 70

    First Comics News

  • 40

    Weird Science DC Comics

    Alan Scott: The Green Lantern #2 isn’t a superhero comic. It’s an egregious piece of fanfic designed to retcon Alan Scott into a tragically oppressed man dealing with homophobic social ills in WWII-era America. The main plot gets no attention in an issue-long flashback that pulls Green Lantern’s origin far enough away from the source material to be almost unrecognizable.

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