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Absolute Power: Task Force VII #1 (of 7)

60
Comicscore Index
Mixed or average ratings

Based on 9 critic ratings.

SUPER NO MORE!

With the assault on Metropolis’s heroes complete, Amanda Waller’s latest living weapon, the Last Son, sets his sights on the other most powerful supers in the DCU… the Marvel Family! Will their combined powers be enough to survive this terrifying threat?

In this biweekly series we’ll see the Absolute Power event through the eyes of evil—as told from the point of view of the TRINITY OF EVIL!

Publication Date
Publisher
Format
Kindle Edition
Print Length
27 pages
Language
English
Amazon ASIN
B0D8R1P9VW

11%
11%
22%
44%
11%
9 Critic Ratings & Reviews from:
  • 90

    Geek Dad

    So far, this event is almost claustrophobic in its intensity, which is a great way to set the scales and establish why Waller might be a bigger threat than the last alien invasion.

  • 80

    Get Your Comic On

    Absolute Power: Task Force VII sets out a plan to explore important elements of Mark Waid’s event story narrative. As well as clues to the wider direction of travel for the event, Task Force VII is a fun, energetic story in its own right.

  • 80

    The Comicbook Dispatch

    OverallAbsolute Power: Task Force VII #1 is a reasonably suspenseful and an action-packed first chapter that sets the stage for a complex and potentially brutal DC event. Pick it up if you’re interested in a different perspective on superhero stories and enjoy morally complex characters. If you prefer a more straightforward superhero brawl, you might want to wait for future issues to see how the action unfolds. Keep in mind that this is the first issue of a tie-in to a larger event, so the full scope of the story is still being revealed.

  • 80

    But Why Tho?

    Absolute Power: Task Force VII #1 attempts to be ruthless. The issue is an exciting and dramatic brawl through an iconic location. Using the Rock of Eternity as the first battleground for the tie-in suggests that no place is immune from the Amazo robots and Waller’s wrath. The fights are spectacular, and there is a curious subplot laced within, as Last Son has echoes of personality. It may lack a satisfying finishing blow, but it’s an excellent beginning to an event that has been immensely exciting.

  • 70

    Nerd Initiative

  • 60

    AIPT

    If you’re a diehard Shazam fan, Absolute Power: Task Force VII #1 is going to be a no-brainer purchase. For casual fans just looking for the full Absolute Power experience, however, skip this issue as it has little that can’t be summed up quickly.

  • 50

    Batman-News

    I can’t take Task Force VII seriously! Perhaps it is the custom skin androids with flawed yet self-righteous personalities, or the incredulous circumstances they operate upon, but I can’t get onboard with Absolute Power. Most especially, the pacing of this particular issue is off putting. One panel Black Adam deflects freeze breath, the next he’s dodging statues out of nowhere. A better handle on key-framing the most important moments in sequence go a long way in effective storytelling. The strongest part of this issue is the whimsical use of Mr. Dinosaur and Black Adam’s “vessel” conversation with Last Son. There is a chance that the analysis of A.I verses human personality could go in a great direction in the series overall. For now, this was a often fun but unappealing start.

  • 35

    Weird Science DC Comics

    Absolute Power: Task Force VII #1 takes all the urgency, dramatic tension, and seriousness of the Absolute Power event and tosses it out the window in favor of a silly, disjointed, poorly constructed mess of a comic. Williams’s script has all the weight of a deflated balloon, and Yarsky’s confused action choreography is shockingly unskilled.

  • 20

    ComicBook.com

    Much of the issue is situated in the Rock of Eternity in a storage room that varies in size, contents, and arrangement seemingly between every panel. The result is a dismal acknowledgement of what’s occurring on the fringes of Absolute Power and raises the question: Couldn’t all of this have been included in a few narrative captions instead?

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